Dressing is a way of life

Dressing is a way of life. I love the 2000s because everyone started to love haute couture. Women are women, and hurray for that. I think it’s the responsibility of a designer to try to break rules and barriers. It’s a philosophy of life. A practice. If you do this, something will change, what will change is that you will change, your life will change, and if you can change you, you can perhaps change the world.

I design from instinct. It’s the only way I know how to live. What feels good. What feels right. What is needed. Give me a problem and I will approach it creatively, from my gut. When I was young, I lived like an old woman, and when I got old, I had to live like a young person. I feel that things happen for a reason and open up new opportunities. There are always protests, whether you do something good or bad. Even if you do something beneficial, people say you do it because it’s advertising. I love women’s fashion, but women don’t need me as much as men do. It’s the men who have nothing to wear.

I like the irony in my work. I couldn’t love a woman who inspired me to be totally disinterested. If I fell in love with a woman for an artistic reason, or from the point of view of my work, I think it would rob her of something. If you cut a painter’s hands off, he’d still feel the urge to pick up a brush. You cannot be creative with people around you. I feel that things happen for a reason and open up new opportunities.

Delete the negative; accentuate the positive! I never like to think that I design for a particular person. I design for the woman I wanted to be, the woman I used to be, and – to some degree – the woman I’m still a little piece of. Men don’t want another man to look at their woman because they don’t know how to handle it. The market is like a language, and you have to be able to understand what they’re saying. I like to be real. I don’t like things to be staged or fussy.

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